Memoir


Interview with Expat author - Rita Gardner

10 June, 2014 08:10  Erin Erin

rita The Coconut Latitudes

I’m Rita Gardner, and I grew up as an expat on a coconut farm in the Dominican Republic from the time I was just a few weeks old until I was nineteen. I now live in California right on San Francisco Bay.

1. Why did you move abroad?
I like to joke that my first trip abroad was in the womb; my parents were at a jobsite in Uruguay when my mother got pregnant. (My father was an electrical engineer and worked around the globe at the time.) When he landed an assignment in the Dominican Republic, he chucked his former life and hauled his wife and two young daughters to a remote coastal village, bought some land and became a coconut farmer. My sister and I were home-schooled via the Calvert School—still the go-to education for many expats today.

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Interview with Expat author - Apple Gidley

13 May, 2014 08:03  Erin Erin

Apple Gidley Hi, I’m Apple Gidley. Of Anglo-Australian parentage born in London, England, educated in Asia, Australia and England, currently living in Houston, Texas.

1. Why did you move abroad?
To meet my father who was living in Kano, Nigeria when I was born. Mum and I joined him when I was a month old, had my shots and got my passport.

2. How do you make a living? Are you a fulltime writer?
Yes I’m a full-time writer but fortunately have a husband who subsidizes my writing, otherwise I’d be sharing kibble with Marley, my cat, whose favourite spot is on my desk.  
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Interview with Expat author - Francesca Maggi

08 April, 2014 09:29  Erin Erin

Francesca Maggi My nom de plume is Francesca Maggi and I use it when I perform too, so it’s my nome in arte as well! [It’s an inside joke that Readers will just have to figure out for themselves].

1. Why did you move abroad?
As I state in my book, I had wanted to live in Italy as long as I could remember (despite getting sick from the water or being cramped with 3 siblings in a Fiat 500 in the scorching heat when I was 6 yrs old).  So, I started working with Italy just 3 days after graduation (moving there on an internship). After 1 year, I landed jobs in New York that brought me back repeatedly (and with expense accounts!). I finally got a job that sent me to Milan in 1992, and I’ve never looked back (well, okay…every time the utilities bills roll in, but…)
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Interview with Expat author - Baye McNeil

11 March, 2014 08:42  Erin Erin

Baye McNeilMy name is Baye McNeil, and I'm from Brooklyn, NY. I currently live in Yokohama, Japan.

1. Why did you move abroad?
I wanted to get away from New York for a while after 9/11. A while has turned into a decade. The years just creep up on you living abroad.

2. How do you make a living? Are you a fulltime writer?
Not yet. I make ends meet also working as a teacher (how cliche) at a JHS in Yokohama, and I have a dozen or so private students that keep me busy when I'm not writing.

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Interview with Expat author - Lana Penrose

06 November, 2013 11:29  Erin Erin

To Hellas and Back Lana PenroseA former Australian expat in Greece, Lana Penrose is a bestselling author twice published by Penguin/Viking. She has worked as a record company promotions manager, music journalist and television producer, and worked briefly with Simon Cowell amongst others of the pop elite.

1. Why did you move abroad?
I moved to Greece because my partner was offered a position to run an Athenian radio station. Being a former MTV producer, I looked upon it as a potential sun-filled sabbatical where I’d spend a year unraveling the mysteries of the universe whilst popping olives into my mouth. Things didn’t quite work out that way!
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Interview with Expat author - Tony James Slater

05 June, 2013 09:00  Erin Erin

Tony James SlaterTony James Slater is the author of crazy travel-comedy ‘That Bear Ate My Pants!’. He is a very, very strange man. He believes himself to be indestructible, despite considerable evidence to the contrary. He is often to be found making strange faces whilst pretending to be attacked by inanimate objects. And sometimes - not always, but often enough to be of concern - his testicles hang out of the holes in his trousers.

It is for this reason (amongst others) that he chooses to spend his life far from mainstream civilization, tackling ridiculous challenges and subjecting himself to constant danger. He gets hurt quite a lot.
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Interview with Expat author - Norman Schriever

08 May, 2013 10:11  Erin Erin

Norm Schriever My name is Norman Schriever, but my friends call me Norm.  You can call me Mr. Schriever.  Or “dude!”  

I’m from New Haven, Connecticut originally, and spent a decade in California.  I’ve lived in Costa Rica and Nicaragua the last couple of years, and headed to Asia next.  

1. Why did you move abroad?
Should I be honest and say it was because I couldn’t hold down a job or get a date in the States?  Nah, I’ll lie and say that I love traveling, exploring other cultures, and it’s always been my dream to be a writer, documenting real peoples’ stories from lost corners of the world.  
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Interview with Expat author - Jill Dobbe

04 April, 2013 10:50  Erin Erin

HERE WE ARE and THERE WE GO Jill Hi, I am Jill Dobbe and I am an overseas educator of 20 years and a recently published author of a travel memoir, HERE WE ARE & THERE WE GO: Teaching and Traveling With Kids in Tow. The expat life is not new to me as I have lived in seven different countries by now.  I am also a mother of two adult children who grew up overseas and continue to have the travel bug.  My daughter is currently teaching in Honduras and my son is in medical school in Grenada.  I am also an avid reader and a shopping addict. I continue to love to travel and I especially love to shop in out-of- the-way foreign markets, even though by this time my condo in Wisconsin has no more room for more arts and crafts (and my husband also says he is sick and tired of carrying them across the world).  Actually, according to my husband, the only reason I like to travel is because “I see the world as just one big shopping mall!”
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Interview with Expat author - Meghan Fenn

05 March, 2013 10:53  Erin Erin

Bringing up Brits meghan Meghan Fenn, Korean born American currently living in England with an English man and three British born children.

1. Why did you move abroad?
Originally I moved abroad to teach English at the University of Prague. It was there in Prague that I met my British husband. We lived and worked there for two years. Then I lived abroad in Tokyo for two and a half years and then I moved to England to be with my British boyfriend (now my husband).

2. How do you make a living? Are you a fulltime writer?
I own a design company and I am a graphic and web designer. This is my full time job. I also write (Bringing Up Brits: Expat Parents Raising Cross-Cultural Kids in Britain is my first book) and blog for my own blog www.bringingupbrits.co.uk/blog and I write guest blog posts for others bloggers.
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Interview with Expat author - Cherie Magnus

06 February, 2013 10:31  Erin Erin

The Church of Tango My name is Cherie Magnus, but most folks on the internet know me as tangocherie for my blog. Born and raised in Los Angeles, California, I left there in 2001 to live in Mexico, and then in 2003 I moved to Buenos Aires, Argentina, with Phoebe the expat cat. In January 2012, I published my first book, The Church of Tango: a Memoir—Death, Dance, Destiny.

1. Why did you move abroad?

I had a series of losses in my life beginning with the death of my beloved husband from cancer. More loss followed including the family home, my mother to Alzheimer’s, and my own two cancers. I had to take early retirement from my job as a dance reference librarian in the Los Angeles Public Library. Then money was an issue and so I moved to Mexico where I thought life would be cheaper. I also took it as an opportunity to live in a foreign culture and learn a new language. But I was a tango dancer and so I was drawn to Buenos Aires, the Mecca of tango that I had occasionally visited since I began dancing tango in 1997. In 2001 Argentina suffered an economic crisis and it was very inexpensive. Since then things changed and inflation has skyrocketed—something that most expats don’t think about when they make the decision to leave home for greener foreign fields.
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